• Neuropsychology Course
  • Neuroscience Course
  • Neuropsychology Workshop

July 28: Webinar "Traumatic Brain Injury"

The webinar will be streamed live on July 28 (Saturday), 12pm (noon) – 3pm Eastern Time (11am – 2pm Central Time / 9am – 12pm Pacific Time).
To participate, please click on the "Join the Webinar" link below and enter your personal 6 digit PIN code which was emailed to you earlier.
If you purchased a ticket but did not receive a PIN code, please contact us immediately by email at info@lninstitute.org or call 212-541-6412.

Cutting-Edge Neuropsychology and Neuroscience

Luria Neuroscience Institute disseminates state-of-the-art information about the brain and the mind through workshops, lectures, and seminars on various topics of neuropsychology and neuroscience. We promote and conduct cutting edge research through an international network of collaborations with leading universities and research centers. We foster and facilitate international and interdisciplinary collaborations and exchanges. Bridging the gap between clinicians, educators, and neuroscientists through a vigorous exchange of ideas and information is central to our mission. LNI is based in New York City and we offer our programs worldwide.
Please contact us for more information about LNI programs.

Webinars

The Luria Neuroscience Institute is pleased to introduce webinars about the brain and the mind. The programs are intended primarily for professionals concerned with mental health and with brain and brain disorders, but they are also open to the members of the general public.
The webinars will feature Elkhonon Goldberg, Ph.D., ABPP., a clinical neuropsychologist and cognitive neuroscientist, Clinical Professor in the Department of Neurology, NYU School of Medicine and Diplomate of The American Board of Professional Psychology in Clinical Neuropsychology. His critically acclaimed and bestselling books have been published in 21 languages.

Each webinar takes 3 hours and 3 CE Credits will be awarded for each. The participant will be able to print out the certificate immediately after filling out a short quiz. The fee for each webinar is $145.
There is a separate $15 processing fee charged by CE credit sponsor R. Cassidy Seminars.

 

Executive Functions and the Frontal Lobes

July 14, 2018

12pm (noon) – 3pm Eastern Time (11am – 2pm Central Time / 9am – 12pm Pacific Time).

Executive functions represent the highest level of cognitive control and involve goal formation, planning, mental flexibility, impulse control, working memory. Executive functions are mediated by the prefrontal cortex and related structures. In this webinar we will examine their cognitive composition, neural mechanisms, changes throughout the lifespan, and gender differences. We will also examine how executive functions become impaired in a wide range of neurological, neuropsychiatric, neurodevelopmental, and neurogeriatric disorders.

 

Dementias

July 21, 2018

12pm (noon) – 3pm Eastern Time (11am – 2pm Central Time / 9am – 12pm Pacific Time).

Dementias are among the most prevalent neurocognitive disorders presenting a unique set of clinical and societal challenges. In this webinar we will review several major types of dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease, Lewy body dementia and its relationship to Parkinson’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, vascular dementia, and others. For each of these disorders we will discuss the underlying neurobiology, epidemiology, natural history, diagnosis, and cognitive characteristics. We will also discuss cognitive aging, as well as both protective and risk factors associated with it.

 

Traumatic Brain Injury

July 28, 2018

12pm (noon) – 3pm Eastern Time (11am – 2pm Central Time / 9am – 12pm Pacific Time).

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a highly prevalent condition sometimes referred to as a “silent epidemic.” In this webinar we will review various types of TBI (closed, open, blast); various causes and unique characteristics of motor vehicle accidents, workplace-related, military and sports TBI; various mechanisms of TBI (diffuse axonal injury, contre-coup, neurometabolic cascade); cognitive characteristics (particularly executive and memory impairment); recovery from TBI and long-term outcomes; and forensic issues commonly associated with TBI.

 

Fee:

$145 for a three-hour webinar. For those requiring CE credits, there is a separate $15 processing fee charged by CE credit sponsor R. Cassidy Seminars.

 

Webinar for Australia

Australasian Society for the Study of Brain Impairment We are pleased to announce a partnership between The Luria Neuroscience Institute and The Australasian Society for the Study of Brain Impairment (ASSBI) in the development of educational and research programs.


August 4: Webinar "Executive Functions and the Frontal Lobes"

The webinar will be streamed live on August 4 (Saturday), 1pm - 4pm Australian Eastern Time.

Executive functions represent the highest level of cognitive control and involve goal formation, planning, mental flexibility, impulse control, working memory. Executive functions are mediated by the prefrontal cortex and related structures. In this webinar we will examine their cognitive composition, neural mechanisms, changes throughout the lifespan, and gender differences. We will also examine how executive functions become impaired in a wide range of neurological, neuropsychiatric, neurodevelopmental, and neurogeriatric disorders.

About the Instructor
The webinar will feature Elkhonon Goldberg, Ph.D., ABPP, a clinical neuropsychologist and cognitive neuroscientist, Clinical Professor in the Department of Neurology, NYU School of Medicine and Diplomate of The American Board of Professional Psychology in Clinical Neuropsychology. He was a student and close associate of the great neuropsychologist Alexander Luria. Elkhonon Goldberg authored numerous research papers on functional cortical organization, hemispheric specialization, frontal lobe functions and dysfunction, memory and amnesias, traumatic brain injury, dementias, and schizophrenia. His books The Executive Brain (2001), The Wisdom Paradox (2005), and The New Executive Brain (2009) have met with international acclaim. Goldberg recently published two new books: Executive Functions in Health and Disease (2017) and Creativity: The Human Brain in the Age of Innovation (2018).

Agenda:
Executive functions and frontal-lobe functions: are they the same?
Components of executive functions (planning, impulse control, working memory, and others).
Novel approaches to understanding the frontal-lobe functions.
Frontal lobes and large-scale networks (Central Executive, Default Mode, and others).
Executive functions and laterality.
Executive functions and sex differences.
Regulation of emotions: frontal lobes and amygdala.
Executive functions and intelligence.
Executive functions in development and aging.

Date: August 4 (Saturday), 1pm - 4pm Australian Eastern Time
Fee: $145 USD (approximately AU$195) (please inquire ASSBI (click here to send email) if you are an ASSBI member or an ASSBI student member to get a discounted promotional code).

Past LNI Educational Programs

Selected LNI courses are listed below in reverse chronological order.

Webinars March – April 2018

Each webinar takes 3 hours and 3 CE Credits will be awarded for each. The participant will be able to print out the certificate immediately after filling out a short quiz.
Recordings are available for purchase.

Courses “Brain and Cognition” and “Neurocognitive Disorders” 4-day lecture sequences (March – June, 2017)

These 4-day lecture series covered a wide range of topics on the relationship between the brain and the mind in health and disease. Brain mechanisms of cognitive functions were reviewed, as well as the neurocognitive disorders. Cognitive characteristics of several disorders affecting cognition were also reviewed.

Brain and Cognition in Health and Disease: 5-day lecture sequence (January – May, 2016)

This 5-day lecture sequence covered a wide range of topics on the relationship between the brain and the mind in health and disease. Brain mechanisms of major cognitive functions were reviewed. Brain mechanisms and cognitive characteristics of major disorders affecting cognition were also reviewed.

Neurocognitive Clinical Case Review Workshops (September – December, 2015)

Peer review and discussion of challenging and interesting clinical cases is an indispensable part of professional education and growth. Luria Neuroscience Institute provided a forum for such reviews. Participants were able to present their own clinical cases and to discuss those presented by their peers, with Elkhonon Goldberg, Ph.D., ABPP serving as the moderator. Each meeting was 3-hour long and 3 CE credits were awarded to the interested participants. The meetings were conducted in small groups in order to ensure active engagement.

Neurocognitive Clinical Case Review Workshops (April – June, 2015)

Peer review and discussion of challenging and interesting clinical cases is an indispensable part of professional education and growth. Luria Neuroscience Institute provided a forum for such reviews. Participants were able to present their own clinical cases and to discuss those presented by their peers, with Elkhonon Goldberg, Ph.D., ABPP serving as the moderator. Each meeting was 3-hour long and 3 CE credits were awarded to the interested participants. The meetings were conducted in small groups in order to ensure active engagement.

Laterality in Health and Disease (February 21, 2015)

Topics covered:
  1. Where the traditional notions of hemispheric specialization got it wrong.
  2. Functional laterality and brain anatomy.
  3. Novel approaches to hemispheric specialization.
  4. How the two hemispheres develop and age.
  5. Laterality and gender and handedness differences.
  6. Laterality and regulation of emotions.
  7. Laterality and learning disabilities (dyslexias vs NVLD).
  8. Laterality and dementias: Is fronto-temporal dementia lateralized?
  9. Laterality and striatal disorders (Parkinson’s disease and Tourette’s syndrome).
  10. Major cerebrovascular disorders and cerebral hemispheres.
  11. Laterality and neuropsychiatric disorders: Schizophrenia and the left hemisphere.
  12. Laterality and differential functional breakdown threshold.

Frontal Lobes in Health and Disease (February 7, 2015)

Topics covered:
  1. Executive functions and frontal-lobe functions: are they the same?
  2. Components of executive functions (planning, impulse control, working memory, and others).
  3. Novel approaches to understanding the frontal-lobe functions.
  4. Executive functions, laterality, and sex differences.
  5. Regulation of emotions: frontal lobes and amygdala.
  6. Executive functions in development and aging.
  7. Executive dysfunction in neurodevelopmental disorders (ADHD, Tourette’s Syndrome).
  8. Executive dysfunction in dementias (Alzheimer’s disease, Lewy body dementia, Fronto-temporal dementia).
  9. Executive dysfunction in cerebrovascular disorders (CVA, aneurisms).
  10. Executive dysfunction in traumatic brain injury (reticulo-frontal disconnection syndrome).
  11. Executive dysfunction in neuropsychiatric disorders.
  12. Executive dysfunction in movement disorders (Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease).

Brain and Cognition: A Cognitive Neuroscience Lecture Series (January – May, 2014)

This course is a sequence of cognitive neuroscience lectures covering a wide range of topics on the relationship between the brain and the mind. The lecture series is intended for the mental health professionals concerned with brain health and brain disorders: psychologists, neuropsychologists, psychiatrists, neurologists, cognitive neuroscientists, and other clinicians and researchers. Brain mechanisms of major cognitive functions will be reviewed, as well as the major neurocognitive disorders. While this is primarily a lecture sequence, the number of the course participants will be kept intentionally relatively small to enable active audience participation. The topics covered in this mental health seminar are listed below. They will be addressed in the course of five day-long lectures (8am-6pm with a lunch break), offered one day a month, January-May 2014.

Major Neurocognitive Disorders: A Clinical Neuropsychology Lecture Series (January – May, 2014)

This course is a lecture series covering a wide range of topics on major brain disorders affecting cognition. The course is intended for the professionals concerned with brain health and brain disorders: psychologists, neuropsychologists, psychiatrists, neurologists, cognitive neuroscientists, and other clinicians and researchers. Brain mechanisms and cognitive characteristics of several major disorders affecting cognition will be reviewed. While this is primarily a lecture sequence, the number of participants will be kept intentionally relatively small to enable active audience participation. The topics covered in this mental health seminar are listed below. They will be addressed in the course of five day-long lectures (8am-6pm with a lunch break), offered one day a month, January-May 2014.

Neurocognitive Clinical Case Review: A Mental Health Workshop (January – May, 2014)

This series of mental health seminars is offered in the form of an informal group discussion. The mental health seminars are intended for professionals actively involved in the diagnosis and treatment of neurocognitive disorders: psychologists, neuropsychologists, psychiatrists, neurologists, etc. Discussion group participants will have an opportunity to present their own challenging clinical cases, as well as to discuss representative cases presented by the group moderator. Clinical cases representing a wide range of neurocognitive disorders will be addressed. These will dementias, traumatic brain injury, cerebrovascular disorders, neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders, and others. The number of participants will be kept relatively small to enable active participation and discussion by every group member. The discussion group will convene once a month for a full day (8am-6pm with a lunch break) for five consecutive sessions, one day a month, January - May 2014.

subscribe

contributors

Elkhonon_Goldberg

Elkhonon Goldberg, Ph.D., ABPP

Elkhonon Goldberg, Ph.D., ABPP, is a world-renowned neuropsychologist and cognitive neuroscientist. His books The Executive Brain, The Wisdom Paradox, and The New Executive Brain have been translated into many languages and have met with international acclaim. Goldberg has held a number of academic appointments in the USA and worldwide and is currently Clinical Professor in the Department of Neurology at NYU Medical School.

Research at LNI

Luria Neuroscience Institute supports research into a wide range of topics through an extensive network of international collaborations. These include:

  • A collaborative project between Elkhonon Goldberg of Luria Neuroscience Institute, and Gideon Kowadlo and David Rawlinson of Project AGI is underway, developing biologically inspired computational models of general intelligence.
  • Structural and functional differences between the two cerebral hemispheres.
  • Cortical gene expression in the frontal lobes in neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders.
  • Tourette’s syndrome and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.
  • Patterns of cognitive impairment in Parkinson’s disease (PD).
  • Lateralization of frontal-lobe functions.

neuroblog

Misdiagnoses in the elderly: “late onset schizophrenia” or early dementia?

Schizophrenia is many mental health professionals’ favorite default diagnosis. And nothing is more likely to trigger the diagnosis of schizophrenia than psychosis. But psychosis is an opaque term which may...

Misdiagnoses in the elderly: pseudodementia due to depression or pseudodepression due to dementia?

Distinguishing between dementia and depression in the elderly maysometimes be tricky.When memory lapses or word finding difficulties become conspicuous in an elderly individual, there is usuallylittle doubt thatan early stage...

Cognitive neuroscience

The term “cognitive neuroscience” is of relatively recent coinage. Sometime in the mid- eighties, I used this term in the company of respectable molecular and sensory neuroscientists,and this was immediately...

Sex differences in the brain

In our “politically correct” society any consideration of sex differences is often approached with trepidation. In neuroscience they have been frequently underemphasized and altogether ignored. Indeed, the perusal of any...

“Mild” Traumatic Brain Injury

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) has been called “a silent epidemic.” While it does not have the mystique of Schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s Disease, or HIV encephalopathy, TBI is every bit as prevalent...