June 2024: Webinar Series About the Brain and the Mind

Each webinar takes 3 hours and 3 CE Credits will be awarded for every live webinar by CE credit sponsor to licensed professionals.

CUE Management Solutions, LLC is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. CUE Management Solutions, LLC maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
CUE Management Solutions, LLC is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0242.

Instructor Credentials: Elkhonon Goldberg, Ph.D., ABPP., a clinical neuropsychologist and cognitive neuroscientist, and Diplomate of The American Board of Professional Psychology in Clinical Neuropsychology. His critically acclaimed and bestselling books have been translated into 24 languages.

Tuition: $165

Format: three-hour long online webinar

Date and time:
1. How the Brain Deals with Novelty and Uncertainty
June 6 (Thursday) from 1pm to 4pm Eastern Time (noon–3pm Central Time, 10am–1pm Pacific Time)
2. Creativity and the Brain
June 8 (Saturday) from 10am to 1pm Eastern Time (9am–noon Central Time, 7am–10am Pacific Time)
3. Memory and Memory Impairments
June 9 (Sunday) from 10am to 1pm Eastern Time (9am–noon Central Time, 7am–10am Pacific Time)
4. Executive Functions and the Frontal Lobes
June 13 (Thursday) from 1pm to 4pm Eastern Time (noon–3pm Central Time, 10am–1pm Pacific Time)

Training appropriate for: The course is intended for professionals concerned with mental health and with brain and brain disorders.
The course content level: Intermediate.
 

 

How the Brain Deals with Novelty and Uncertainty

June 6 (Thursday) from 1pm to 4pm Eastern Time (noon–3pm Central Time, 10am–1pm Pacific Time)

Fully deterministic, fixed situations exist only in psychology experiments. By contrast, real life is full of novel challenges and uncertainties. Furthermore, complex systems, both biological and artificial, must have the ability to acquire new information without degrading previously acquired information. In this webinar we will discuss how evolution “solved” these challenges by distributing the responsibilities between the two hemispheres: the right hemisphere is more adept at dealing with novel, ambiguous situations; and the left hemisphere at preserving well established knowledge and cognitive routines. We will review the developmental and neuroimaging evidence for this broad functional distinction, its neural mechanisms, and its evolutionary history in primates, dolphins, birds, and even in invertebrate species. We will also examine how this new understanding of hemispheric specialization sheds new light on certain neurological disorders.
 
Topics to be covered:
What is wrong with the classic view of hemispheric specialization.
Morphological, cellular, and biochemical asymmetries in the brain.
Novelty vs familiarity is a fundamental cognitive distinction throughout evolution and in human development.
Cognitive novelty and the right hemisphere.
Cognitive routines and the left hemisphere.
Functional lateralization in primates, dolphins, birds, and bees.
Neural mechanisms behind the novelty-routinization distinction.
Aberrant laterality and its clinical manifestations.
 
Learning objectives for training:
Describe the morphological, cellular, and biochemical differences between the two hemispheres.
Explain the distinction between cognitive novelty and cognitive routines.
Conceptualize the functional differences between the right and left hemisphere.
Summarize the evolutionary history of hemispheric specialization.
 

 

Creativity and the Brain

June 8 (Saturday) from 10am to 1pm Eastern Time (9am–noon Central Time, 7am–10am Pacific Time)

Numerous claims have been made in the scientific and popular literature, linking creativity to specific brain structures. Which among these claims are accurate and which are tabloid oversimplifications? The multicomponential nature of creativity implies that multiple brain structures are involved. The right hemisphere has a preferential relationship to novelty-seeking. We will discuss the evidence for, and the mechanisms of this relationship. The prefrontal cortex is critical for decision making and for determining what is important. We will discuss the mechanisms of how this happens. Even the most original innovation is built on previously accumulated knowledge and concepts. The left hemisphere is particularly important as the “repository” of such knowledge. What is the relationship between the deliberate and effortful vs. the unconscious and spontaneous? These two complementary components of the creative process may be related to the hyperfrontal vs. hypofrontal brain states. We will discuss this relationship. Is there a genetic basis for creativity? This question is closely linked to another one: the genetic basis of intelligence. We will discuss both questions. The age of a solitary genius is mostly over. Increasingly the creative process is a team process both in science, industry, and the arts. We will discuss the nascent research into group creativity.
 
Topics to be covered:
Facts and fads of creativity. No single locus in the brain.
Creativity, novelty, and the right hemisphere.
Salience, decision making, and the frontal lobes.
“Standing on the shoulders of giants” and the left hemisphere.
Perspiration and inspiration: hyperfrontality and hypofrontality.
Creativity and the genes: candidate genes and whole genome.
Group creativity: How different brains can work better together.
 
Learning objectives for training:
Describe the relationship between novelty seeking, creativity, and the right hemisphere.
Describe the relationship between the decision making, creativity, and the frontal lobes.
Describe the concepts of hyperfrontality and hypofrontality in innovation and creativity.
Describe the evidence for and against genetic basis of creativity and intelligence.
 

 

Memory and Memory Impairments

June 9 (Sunday) from 10am to 1pm Eastern Time (9am–noon Central Time, 7am–10am Pacific Time)

Memory is among the most important cognitive functions, and memory impairment is among the most common and most catastrophic consequences of neurological and psychiatric conditions. In this webinar we will review the basic neurobiology of memory and various forms of memory in normal cognition, including associative memory and working memory. We will then review various amnestic syndromes, e.g. anterograde and retrograde amnesias; and types of memory impairments across a wide range of brain disorders. These include Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias; Korsakoff syndrome; traumatic brain injury; temporal lobe epilepsy; viral encephalopathies including COVID-19, HIV encephalopathy, and herpes simplex encephalopathy; and other disorders, as well as usually ignored neurodevelopmental memory impairments. We will discuss memory changes in aging and efforts to protect it.
 
Topics to be covered:
Basic neurobiology of memory. Components of memory circuits and their neuroanatomy.
Types of memory from a cognitive standpoint: associative vs working; explicit vs implicit; intentional vs incidental.
Forgetting and why it is useful.
Amnesias: anterograde vs retrograde; general vs modality specific.
Assessment of memory and amnesias.
Memory and aging.
Memory impairment in dementias (Alzheimer’s and others).
Memory impairment in traumatic brain injury (TBI).
Memory impairment in viral encephalopathies (Herpes Simplex, HIV, COVID-19).
Memory and neurodevelopmental disorders: neglected condition.
 
Learning objectives for training:
Explain basic mechanisms of memory.
Describe different forms of memory.
Explain major forms of amnesia
Describe memory impairments in dementias, traumatic brain injuries, and viral
encephalopathies.
 

 

Executive Functions and the Frontal Lobes

June 13 (Thursday) from 1pm to 4pm Eastern Time (noon–3pm Central Time, 10am–1pm Pacific Time)

Executive functions represent the highest level of cognitive control and involve goal formation, planning, mental flexibility, impulse control, working memory. Executive functions are mediated by the prefrontal cortex and related structures. In this webinar we will examine their cognitive composition, neural mechanisms, changes throughout the lifespan, and gender differences. We will also examine how executive functions become impaired in a wide range of neurological, neuropsychiatric, neurodevelopmental, and neurogeriatric disorders.
 
Topics to be covered:
Executive functions and frontal-lobe functions: are they the same?
Components of executive functions (planning, impulse control, working memory, and others).
Novel approaches to understanding the frontal-lobe functions.
Frontal lobes and large-scale networks (Central Executive, Default Mode, and others).
Executive functions and laterality.
Executive functions and sex differences.
Regulation of emotions: frontal lobes and amygdala.
Executive functions and intelligence.
Executive functions in development and aging.
 
Learning objectives for training:
List brain mechanisms of executive functions: Prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, striatum, related structures and their subdivisions.
Explain the process and brain mechanisms of decision-making: The frontal lobes and “executive functions”.
Explain the brain mechanisms of emotions: Amygdala and the frontal lobes.
Describe executive functions in normal development and aging.
 

 
 

Conflicts of Interest:
There is no known commercial interest or conflict of interest for this program.

Cancellation Policy:
If for any reason you need to cancel, please contact the trainer so we can work together to determine a resolution.
Dr. Elkhonon Goldberg, Ph.D., ABPP: info@lninstitute.org 800-906-5866

Grievance Policy:
We seek to ensure equitable treatment of every person and to make every attempt to resolve grievances in a fair manner. Please email us with your written grievance. Grievances would receive, to the best of our ability, corrective action in order to prevent further problems.

ADA Needs:
If you have any special requests, please email/call: Karen Newell: 707-321-0926 newell@sonic.net

CE and Commercial Support:
CUE Management Solutions, LLC does not have a relevant financial relationship(s) with ineligible companies or other potentially biasing relationships to disclose to learners.
 

Continuing Education

CUE Management Solutions, LLC is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. CUE Management Solutions, LLC maintains responsibility for this program and its content.