February 2024: Webinar Series About the Brain and the Mind

Each webinar takes 3 hours and 3 CE Credits will be awarded for every live webinar by CE credit sponsor to licensed professionals.

CUE Management Solutions, LLC is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. CUE Management Solutions, LLC maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

Instructor Credentials: Elkhonon Goldberg, Ph.D., ABPP., a clinical neuropsychologist and cognitive neuroscientist, and Diplomate of The American Board of Professional Psychology in Clinical Neuropsychology. His critically acclaimed and bestselling books have been translated into 24 languages.

Tuition:
Professional: $165
Limited time offer for students: $90 (please email us your name, educational institution and we will send you the instructions)

Format:
three-hour long online webinar

Date:
1. Executive Functions and the Frontal Lobes, February 3 (Saturday)

2. Memory and Memory Impairments, February 10 (Saturday)

3. Laterality, Novelty and Functional Organization of the Brain, February 24 (Saturday)

4. Aging and dementias, March 2 (Saturday)
5. Traumatic Brain Injury, March 9 (Saturday)

Time:
10am–1pm Eastern Time USA, 16:00-19:00 Central European Time (CET)

Training appropriate for: The course is intended for professionals concerned with mental health and with brain and brain disorders.
The course content level: Intermediate.

 

Executive Functions and the Frontal Lobes

February 3, 2024, 10am–1pm Eastern Time USA, 16:00-19:00 Central European Time (CET)

Executive functions represent the highest level of cognitive control and involve goal formation, planning, mental flexibility, impulse control, working memory. Executive functions are mediated by the prefrontal cortex and related structures. In this webinar we will examine their cognitive composition, neural mechanisms, changes throughout the lifespan, and gender differences. We
will also examine the role of executive functions in creativity and their relationship to intelligence.

Topics to be covered:
Executive functions and frontal-lobe functions: are they the same?
Components of executive functions (planning, impulse control, working memory, and others).
Novel approaches to understanding the frontal-lobe functions.
Frontal lobes and large-scale networks (Central Executive, Default Mode, and others).
Executive functions and laterality.
Executive functions and sex differences.
Regulation of emotions: frontal lobes and amygdala.
Executive functions and intelligence.
Executive functions in development and aging.
 
Learning objectives for training:
1. List brain mechanisms of executive functions: Prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, striatum, related structures and their subdivisions.
2. Explain the process and brain mechanisms of decision-making: The frontal lobes and “executive functions”.
3. Explain the brain mechanisms of emotions: Amygdala and the frontal lobes.
4. Describe executive functions in normal development and aging.
 

Memory and Memory Impairments

February 10, 2024, 10am–1pm Eastern Time USA, 16:00-19:00 Central European Time (CET)

Memory is among the most important cognitive functions, and memory impairment is among the most common and most catastrophic consequences of neurological and psychiatric conditions. In this webinar we will review the basic neurobiology of memory and various forms of memory in normal cognition, including associative memory and working memory. We will then review various amnestic syndromes, e.g. anterograde and retrograde amnesias; and types of memory impairments across a wide range of brain disorders. These include Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias; Korsakoff syndrome; traumatic brain injury; temporal lobe epilepsy; viral encephalopathies including COVID-19, HIV encephalopathy, and herpes simplex encephalopathy; and other disorders, as well as usually ignored neurodevelopmental memory impairments. We will discuss memory changes in aging and efforts to protect it.

Topics to be covered:
Basic neurobiology of memory. Components of memory circuits and their neuroanatomy.
Types of memory from a cognitive standpoint: associative vs working; explicit vs implicit; intentional vs incidental.
Forgetting and why it is useful.
Amnesias: anterograde vs retrograde; general vs modality specific.
Assessment of memory and amnesias.
Memory and aging.
Memory impairment in dementias (Alzheimer’s and others).
Memory impairment in traumatic brain injury (TBI).
Memory impairment in viral encephalopathies (Herpes Simplex, HIV, COVID-19).
Memory and neurodevelopmental disorders: neglected condition.
 
Learning objectives for training:
1. Explain basic mechanisms of memory.
2. Describe different forms of memory.
3. Explain major forms of amnesia
4. Describe memory impairments in dementias, traumatic brain injuries, and viral
encephalopathies.
 

Laterality, Novelty and Functional Organization of the Brain

February 24, 2024, 10am–1pm Eastern Time USA, 16:00-19:00 Central European Time (CET)

Laterality is a fundamental feature of brain organization. In this webinar we will discuss why the traditional understanding of hemispheric specialization fails to capture all its essential aspects, and will introduce a new understanding of brain laterality which permits a broader evolutionary perspective. We will review the neuroanatomical and biochemical differences between the two hemispheres; their respective (and changing) roles in cognition across the lifespan; examine gender and handedness differences in laterality; as well as the relationship between hemispheric specialization and emotions. We will also review the nature of hemispheric specialization across species throughout evolution.

Topics to be covered:
Where the traditional notions of hemispheric specialization got it wrong.
Functional laterality and brain anatomy. Laterality throughout evolution.
Novel approaches to hemispheric specialization.
How the two hemispheres develop and age.
Laterality and gender and handedness differences.
Laterality and regulation of emotions.
 
Learning objectives for training:
1. Describe biological differences between the cerebral hemispheres: morphology, connectivity, and biochemistry.
2. Describe sex differences in hemispheric specialization: How is hemispheric laterality different in females and males.
3. Explain the limitations of the traditional paradigm: Left-hemispheric language and right-hemispheric spatial processing? Not so simple.
4. Explain the roles of the two hemispheres in learning: the role of the right hemisphere in dealing with cognitive novelty and of the left hemisphere in maintaining well-formed knowledge.
 

Aging and Dementias

March 2, 2024, 10am–1pm Eastern Time USA, 16:00-19:00 Central European Time (CET)

Dementias are among the most prevalent neurocognitive disorders presenting a unique set of clinical and societal challenges. In this webinar we will review several major types of dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease, Lewy body dementia and its relationship to Parkinson’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, vascular dementia, and others. For each of these disorders we will discuss the underlying neurobiology, epidemiology, natural history, diagnosis, and cognitive characteristics. We will also discuss cognitive aging, as well as both protective and risk factors associated with it.

Topics to be covered:
Epidemiology and demographics of dementias.
Alzheimer’s disease: neurobiology, epidemiology, natural history, neurocognitive characteristics, and diagnosis. Lewy body dementia and Parkinson’s disease: neurobiology, epidemiology, natural history, neurocognitive characteristics, and diagnosis.
Fronto-temporal dementia: neurobiology, epidemiology, natural history, neurocognitive characteristics, and diagnosis. Vascular dementia: neurobiology, epidemiology, natural history, neurocognitive characteristics, and diagnosis.
Korsakoff’s syndrome: neurobiology, epidemiology, natural history, neurocognitive characteristics, and diagnosis. Mixed dementias: neurobiology, epidemiology, natural history, neurocognitive characteristics, and diagnosis.
Mild Neurocognitive Impairment and its relationship to dementias. Diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and misdiagnosis.
Memory impairment in dementias and the fallacy of old diagnostic criteria. Executive impairment in dementias: still underrecognized.
Arousal impairment in dementias. Changes in the epidemiology of dementias and possible causes behind them. Cognitive aging: its characteristics, protective factors, and risk factors. Cognitive enhancement and surrounding controversies.
 
Learning objectives for training:
1. Describe the biological characteristics of major dementias.
2. Describe the cognitive characteristics of major dementias.
3. Discuss the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of dementias.
4. Explain the factors influencing the course of cognitive aging.
 

Traumatic Brain Injury

March 9, 2024, 10am–1pm Eastern Time USA, 16:00-19:00 Central European Time (CET)

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a highly prevalent condition sometimes referred to as a “silent epidemic.” In this webinar we will review various types of TBI (closed, open, blast); various causes and unique characteristics of motor vehicle accidents, workplace-related, military and sports TBI; various mechanisms of TBI (diffuse axonal injury, contre-coup, neurometabolic cascade); cognitive characteristics (particularly executive and memory impairment); recovery from TBI and long-term outcomes; and forensic issues commonly associated with TBI.

Topics to be covered:
Epidemiology of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Types of traumatic brain injury (TBI): closed, open (penetrating and perforating), blast. Severity and criteria of traumatic brain injury (TBI): mild, moderate, severe.
Causes of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Mechanisms of traumatic brain injury (TBI).
Focal vs. diffuse components of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Neuroanatomical structures most vulnerable in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Natural course of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the multiple forms it may take.
Secondary complications in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Cognitive consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI).
Executive deficit in traumatic brain injury (TBI).
Memory impairment in traumatic brain injury (TBI): anterograde and retrograde amnesia. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in sports and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.
Military traumatic brain injury (TBI). Forensic issues in traumatic brain injury (TBI).
 
Learning objectives for training:
1. Describe the types of traumatic brain injury (TBI).
2. Explain the mechanisms of traumatic brain injury (TBI).
3. List the multiple possible courses of traumatic brain injury (TBI).
4. Explain the cognitive characteristics of traumatic brain injury (TBI).
 
 

Conflicts of Interest:
There is no known commercial interest or conflict of interest for this program.

Cancellation Policy:
If for any reason you need to cancel, please contact the trainer so we can work together to determine a resolution.
Dr. Elkhonon Goldberg, Ph.D., ABPP: info@lninstitute.org 800-906-5866

Grievance Policy:
We seek to ensure equitable treatment of every person and to make every attempt to resolve grievances in a fair manner. Please email us with your written grievance. Grievances would receive, to the best of our ability, corrective action in order to prevent further problems.

ADA Needs:
If you have any special requests, please email/call: Karen Newell: 707-321-0926 newell@sonic.net

CE and Commercial Support:
CUE Management Solutions, LLC does not have a relevant financial relationship(s) with ineligible companies or other potentially biasing relationships to disclose to learners.
 

Continuing Education

CUE Management Solutions, LLC is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. CUE Management Solutions, LLC maintains responsibility for this program and its content.