December 2022: Webinar Series About the Brain and the Mind

The webinars are presented by Elkhonon Goldberg, Ph.D., ABPP., a clinical neuropsychologist and cognitive neuroscientist, and Diplomate of The American Board of Professional Psychology in Clinical Neuropsychology. His critically acclaimed and bestselling books have been translated into 24 languages.

Each webinar takes 3 hours and 3 CE Credits will be awarded by CE credit sponsor.

The course is intended for professionals concerned with mental health and with brain and brain disorders.
The course content level: Intermediate.

Fee:
$165 for a three-hour webinar. There is no additional charge for the CEs certificate.

Format:
online webinar

Date:
1. Executive Functions and the Frontal Lobes, December 8 (Thursday)
2. Aging and Dementias, December 10 (Saturday)
3. Traumatic Brain Injury, December 11 (Sunday)
4. Long NEUROCOVID: What Has Been Learned, December 15 (Thursday)
5. Memory and Memory Impairments, December 22 (Thursday)
6. Brain Disorders and Criminal Behavior, December 29 (Thursday)

Time:
1 pm – 4:15 pm Eastern Time (noon – 3:15pm Central Time, 10am – 1:15pm Pacific Time)
 

 

 
 

Executive Functions and the Frontal Lobes

December 8, 2022, 1 pm – 4:15 pm EST

Executive functions represent the highest level of cognitive control and involve goal formation, planning, mental flexibility, impulse control, working memory. Executive functions are mediated by the prefrontal cortex and related structures. In this webinar we will examine their cognitive composition, neural mechanisms, changes throughout the lifespan, and gender differences. We
will also examine the role of executive functions in creativity and their relationship to intelligence.

Topics to be covered:
Executive functions and frontal-lobe functions: are they the same?
Components of executive functions (planning, impulse control, working memory, and others).
Novel approaches to understanding the frontal-lobe functions.
Frontal lobes and large-scale networks (Central Executive, Default Mode, and others).
Executive functions and laterality.
Executive functions and sex differences.
Regulation of emotions: frontal lobes and amygdala.
Executive functions and intelligence.
Executive functions in development and aging.
 
Learning objectives for training:
1. List brain mechanisms of executive functions: Prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, striatum, related structures and their subdivisions.
2. Explain the process and brain mechanisms of decision-making: The frontal lobes and “executive functions”.
3. Explain the brain mechanisms of emotions: Amygdala and the frontal lobes.
4. Describe executive functions in normal development and aging.
 

Aging and Dementias

December 10, 2022, 1 pm – 4:15 pm EST

Dementias are among the most prevalent neurocognitive disorders presenting a unique set of clinical and societal challenges. In this webinar we will review several major types of dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease, Lewy body dementia and its relationship to Parkinson’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, vascular dementia, and others. For each of these disorders we will discuss the underlying neurobiology, epidemiology, natural history, diagnosis, and cognitive characteristics. We will also discuss cognitive aging, as well as both protective and risk factors associated with it.

Topics to be covered:
Epidemiology and demographics of dementias.
Alzheimer’s disease: neurobiology, epidemiology, natural history, neurocognitive characteristics, and diagnosis. Lewy body dementia and Parkinson’s disease: neurobiology, epidemiology, natural history, neurocognitive characteristics, and diagnosis.
Fronto-temporal dementia: neurobiology, epidemiology, natural history, neurocognitive characteristics, and diagnosis. Vascular dementia: neurobiology, epidemiology, natural history, neurocognitive characteristics, and diagnosis.
Korsakoff’s syndrome: neurobiology, epidemiology, natural history, neurocognitive characteristics, and diagnosis. Mixed dementias: neurobiology, epidemiology, natural history, neurocognitive characteristics, and diagnosis.
Mild Cognitive Impairment and its relationship to dementias. Diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and misdiagnosis.
Memory impairment in dementias and the fallacy of old diagnostic criteria. Executive impairment in dementias: still underrecognized.
Arousal impairment in dementias. Changes in the epidemiology of dementias and possible causes behind them. Cognitive aging: its characteristics, protective factors, and risk factors. Cognitive enhancement and surrounding controversies.
 
Learning objectives for training:
1. Describe the biological characteristics of major dementias.
2. Describe the cognitive characteristics of major dementias.
3. Discuss the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of dementias.
4. Explain the factors influencing the course of cognitive aging.
 

Traumatic Brain Injury

December 11, 2022, 1 pm – 4:15 pm EST

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a highly prevalent condition sometimes referred to as a “silent epidemic.” In this webinar we will review various types of TBI (closed, open, blast); various causes and unique characteristics of motor vehicle accidents, workplace-related, military and sports TBI; various mechanisms of TBI (diffuse axonal injury, contre-coup, neurometabolic cascade); cognitive characteristics (particularly executive and memory impairment); recovery from TBI and long-term outcomes; and forensic issues commonly associated with TBI.

Topics to be covered:
Epidemiology of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Types of traumatic brain injury (TBI): closed, open (penetrating and perforating), blast. Severity and criteria of traumatic brain injury (TBI): mild, moderate, severe.
Causes of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Mechanisms of traumatic brain injury (TBI).
Focal vs. diffuse components of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Neuroanatomical structures most vulnerable in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Natural course of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the multiple forms it may take.
Secondary complications in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Cognitive consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI).
Executive deficit in traumatic brain injury (TBI).
Memory impairment in traumatic brain injury (TBI): anterograde and retrograde amnesia. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in sports and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.
Military traumatic brain injury (TBI). Forensic issues in traumatic brain injury (TBI).
 
Learning objectives for training:
1. Describe the types of traumatic brain injury (TBI).
2. Explain the mechanisms of traumatic brain injury (TBI).
3. List the multiple possible courses of traumatic brain injury (TBI).
4. Explain the cognitive characteristics of traumatic brain injury (TBI).
 

Long NEUROCOVID: What Has Been Learned

December 15, 2022, 1 pm – 4:15 pm EST

New information will be presented about the evolution of the pandemic, challenges associated
with vaccination, and the variants. As the pandemic evolves, its character changes. Vaccines
are here, but so are the new virus variants. We have a better understanding of the mechanisms
of acute and long NEUROCOVID, and of its impact on various segments of the population.
NEUROVID in children and in the elderly is of particular concern, as well as its being a risk
factor for later-life dementia. The burden of the pandemic on the overall psychological state of
the world is growing, but so are the arsenal of tools to counter its effects. These and other
issues will be discussed in the new webinar.

Topics to be covered:
Evolving pandemic statistics.
Vaccination and its challenges.
Acute NEUROCOVID and the variants.
Long NEUROCOVID.
NEUROCOVID and later-life dementias – growing concerns.
NEUROCOVID in children – recent findings.
Worldwide psychological burden of the pandemic two years later.
Rehabilitation of NEUROCOVID.
Telemedicine and NEUROCOVID.
 
Learning objectives for training:
1. Describe the worldwide dynamics of the pandemic.
2. Describe the challenges of vaccination.
3. Explain the growing concerns about dementia later in life after COVID-19 infection.
4. Describe the new findings about NEUROCOVID in children.
 

Memory and Memory Impairments

December 22, 2022, 1 pm – 4:15 pm EST

Memory is among the most important cognitive functions, and memory impairment is among the most common and most catastrophic consequences of neurological and psychiatric conditions. In this webinar we will review the basic neurobiology of memory and various forms of memory in normal cognition, including associative memory and working memory. We will then review various amnestic syndromes, e.g. anterograde and retrograde amnesias; and types of memory impairments across a wide range of brain disorders. These include Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias; Korsakoff syndrome; traumatic brain injury; temporal lobe epilepsy; viral encephalopathies including COVID-19, HIV encephalopathy, and herpes simplex encephalopathy; and other disorders, as well as usually ignored neurodevelopmental memory impairments. We will discuss memory changes in aging and efforts to protect it.

Topics to be covered:
Basic neurobiology of memory. Components of memory circuits and their neuroanatomy.
Types of memory from a cognitive standpoint: associative vs working; explicit vs implicit; intentional vs incidental.
Forgetting and why it is useful.
Amnesias: anterograde vs retrograde; general vs modality specific.
Assessment of memory and amnesias.
Memory and aging.
Memory impairment in dementias (Alzheimer’s and others).
Memory impairment in traumatic brain injury (TBI).
Memory impairment in viral encephalopathies (Herpes Simplex, HIV, COVID-19).
Memory and neurodevelopmental disorders: neglected condition.
 
Learning objectives for training:
1. Explain basic mechanisms of memory.
2. Describe different forms of memory.
3. Explain major forms of amnesia
4. Describe memory impairments in dementias, traumatic brain injuries, and viral
encephalopathies.
 

Brain Disorders and Criminal Behavior

December 29, 2022, 1 pm – 4:15 pm EST

Various brain disorders may alter behavior in ways that result in behaviors judged by society as antisocial or outright criminal. Ultimately the judgment whether certain acts are criminal and to what extent (if any) a history of brain disorder is a mitigating factor, rests with the legal system. However, mental health professionals can make important contributions to these decisions in an advisory capacity. It is important to educate both mental health professionals and members of the legal profession about the many possible ways in which brain damage may contribute to criminal behavior. Socially aberrant behaviors are more common in certain brain disorders than in others; the manifestations may be different, and so are the underlying mechanisms. In this webinar we will review some of the conditions with which aberrant behaviors may be associated. These include dementias, neurodevelopmental disorders, traumatic brain injury,
seizures, space occupying lesions, neuropsychiatric disorders, and others. It is important for clinicians working with these populations to be aware of the potential for socially aberrant behavior, which may be predicated, entirely or in part, on the intrinsic properties of underlying brain disease and associated cognitive impairment and disinhibition.

Topics to be covered:
Relationship between neuropsychological and legal perspectives.
Frontal lobe dysfunction and aberrant behavior.
Criminal behavior in dementias: frontotemporal (FTD) and others.
Criminal behavior in traumatic brain injury (TBI).
Early life TBI as a risk factor for later-life criminality.
Aggression in temporal lobe epilepsy: real or imagined?
Space occupying lesions: arachnoid cysts and violent psychosis.
Is there a relationship between depression and aggression?
Schizophrenia and violence: is there a link?
Neurodevelopmental disorders: aggression and anger.
 
Learning objectives for training:
1. Describe the potential for criminal behavior in dementias.
2. Describe the potential for criminal behavior in traumatic brain injury (TBI).
3. Explain the controversies surrounding violent behavior in seizure disorders.
4. Describe the potential for criminal behavior in space occupying with lesions.
5. Describe the potential for criminal behavior in neuropsychiatric disorders.
 
 
Conflicts of Interest:
There is no known commercial interest or conflict of interest for this program.

Cancellation Policy:
Cancellation of your registration with full refund can be done up to 7 days before the event. Please email us to request your cancellation.

Grievance Policy:
We seek to ensure equitable treatment of every person and to make every attempt to resolve grievances in a fair manner. Please email us with your written grievance. Grievances would receive, to the best of our ability, corrective action in order to prevent further problems.

Accessibility Policy:
This program adheres to the standards of the Americans Disabilities Act. Please contact us if special accommodation is required.
 
 

Continuing Education

New York State:
NY Psychologists: R. Cassidy Seminars is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0018. 3 clock hours. Live online.
NY Psychoanalysts: R. Cassidy Seminars is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychoanalysts. #P-0005. (3) clock hours. Live online.
Social Workers: R. Cassidy Seminars is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Social Work as an approved provider (#0006) of continuing education for licensed social workers. This program is approved for 3 contact hours Live In-person.
NY-LMHCs: R. Cassidy Seminars is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board of Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed mental health counselors. #MHC-0015. (3) contact hours. Live online.
NY-LMFTs: R. Cassidy Seminars is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board of Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed marriage and family therapists. #MFT-0011. (3) contact hours. Live online.
 
Other States:
The CE Company is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The CE Company maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

The CE Company has co-sponsored Memory and Memory Impairments for 3 continuing education (CE) 3 credits to Psychologists, Social Workers, Nurses, Professional Counselors, and Marriage & Family Therapists in the following states*:

Psychologists:
AL, AK, AZ, AR, CA, CO, CT, DE, FL, GA, HI, ID, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, ME, MD, MA, MI, MN, MS, MO, MT, NE, NV, NH, NJ, NM, NC, ND, OH, OK, OR, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VT, VA, WA, WV, WI, WY

Social Workers:
AL, AK, AZ, AR, CA, CO, CT, DE, FL, GA, HI, ID, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, ME, MD, MA, MI, MN, MS, MO, MT, NE, NV, NH, NJ, NM, NC, ND, OH, OK, OR, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VT, VA, WA, WV, WI, WY

Mental Health Counselors:
AL, AK, AZ, AR, CA, CO, CT, DE, FL, GA, HI, ID, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, ME, MD, MA, MI, MN, MS, MO, MT, NE, NV, NH, NJ, NM, NC, ND, OH, OK, OR, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VT, VA, WA, WV, WI, WY

Marriage and Family Therapists:
AL, AK, AZ, AR, CA, CO, CT, DE, FL, GA, HI, ID, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, ME, MD, MA, MI, MN, MS, MO, MT, NE, NV, NH, NJ, NM, NC, ND, OK, OR, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VT, VA, WA, WV, WI, WY

Nurses:
AL, AK, AZ, AR, CA, CO, CT, DE, FL, GA, HI, ID, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, ME, MD, MA, MI, MN, MS, MO, MT, NE, NV, NH, NJ, NM, NC, ND, OH, OK, OR, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VT, VA, WA, WV, WI, WY

Professional Counselors:
AL, AK, AZ, AR, CA, CO, CT, DE, FL, GA, HI, ID, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, ME, MD, MA, MI, MN, MS, MO, MT, NE, NV, NH, NJ, NM, NC, ND, OH, OK, OR, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VT, VA, WA, WV, WI, WY

*Participants should always check with their state’s licensure board regarding the acceptance of APA CE credits. If you are seeking continuing education credit for a specialty or location not listed above, it is your responsibility to contact your licensing/certification board to determine program eligibility. Partial credit for attendance of individual sessions is not available.