• Neuropsychology Course
  • Neuroscience Course
  • Neuropsychology Workshop

Cutting-Edge Neuropsychology and Neuroscience

Luria Neuroscience Institute disseminates state-of-the-art information about the brain and the mind through workshops, lectures, and seminars on various topics of neuropsychology and neuroscience. We promote and conduct cutting edge research through an international network of collaborations with leading universities and research centers. We foster and facilitate international and interdisciplinary collaborations and exchanges. Bridging the gap between clinicians, educators, and neuroscientists through a vigorous exchange of ideas and information is central to our mission. LNI is based in New York City and we offer our programs worldwide.
Please contact us for more information about LNI programs.

Video Courses “The Human Brain and Brain Disorders”

The Luria Neuroscience Institute offers four video courses about the brain and the mind. The courses are intended for the mental health professionals concerned with brain health and brain disorders: psychologists, neuropsychologists, psychiatrists, neurologists, cognitive neuroscientists, and other clinicians and researchers. Each video course takes 3 hours and 3 CE Credits will be awarded for each. The fee for each course is $95. A combined fee for two courses is $180, for three courses is $255, for four courses is $320.

1

Video Course: Executive Functions and the Frontal Lobes


Topics covered:
  1. Executive functions and frontal-lobe functions: are they the same?
  2. Components of executive functions (planning, impulse control, working memory, and others).
  3. Novel approaches to understanding the frontal-lobe functions.
  4. Executive functions, laterality, and sex differences.
  5. Regulation of emotions: frontal lobes and amygdala.
  6. Executive functions in development and aging.
2

Video Course: Executive Dysfunction in Brain Disorders


Topics covered:
  1. Executive dysfunction in neurodevelopmental disorders (ADHD, Tourette’s Syndrome).
  2. Executive dysfunction in dementias (Alzheimer’s disease, Lewy body dementia, Fronto-temporal dementia).
  3. Executive dysfunction in cerebrovascular disorders (CVA, aneurisms).
  4. Executive dysfunction in traumatic brain injury (reticulo-frontal disconnection syndrome).
  5. Executive dysfunction in neuropsychiatric disorders (schizophrenia, affective disorders).
  6. Executive dysfunction in movement disorders (Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease).
3

Video Course: Laterality and Functional Organization of the Brain


Topics covered:
  1. Where the traditional notions of hemispheric specialization got it wrong.
  2. Functional laterality and brain anatomy.
  3. Novel approaches to hemispheric specialization.
  4. How the two hemispheres develop and age.
  5. Laterality and gender and handedness differences.
  6. Laterality and regulation of emotions.
4

Video Course: Laterality and Brain Dysfunction


Topics covered:
  1. Laterality and learning disabilities (dyslexias vs NVLD).
  2. Laterality and dementias: Is fronto-temporal dementia lateralized?
  3. Laterality and striatal disorders (Parkinson’s disease and Tourette’s syndrome).
  4. Major cerebrovascular disorders and cerebral hemispheres.
  5. Laterality and neuropsychiatric disorders: Schizophrenia and the left hemisphere.
  6. Laterality and differential functional breakdown threshold.

Past LNI Educational Programs

Selected LNI courses are listed below in reverse chronological order.

Laterality in Health and Disease (February 21, 2015)


Topics covered:
  1. Where the traditional notions of hemispheric specialization got it wrong.
  2. Functional laterality and brain anatomy.
  3. Novel approaches to hemispheric specialization.
  4. How the two hemispheres develop and age.
  5. Laterality and gender and handedness differences.
  6. Laterality and regulation of emotions.
  7. Laterality and learning disabilities (dyslexias vs NVLD).
  8. Laterality and dementias: Is fronto-temporal dementia lateralized?
  9. Laterality and striatal disorders (Parkinson’s disease and Tourette’s syndrome).
  10. Major cerebrovascular disorders and cerebral hemispheres.
  11. Laterality and neuropsychiatric disorders: Schizophrenia and the left hemisphere.
  12. Laterality and differential functional breakdown threshold.

Frontal Lobes in Health and Disease (February 7, 2015)


Topics covered:
  1. Executive functions and frontal-lobe functions: are they the same?
  2. Components of executive functions (planning, impulse control, working memory, and others).
  3. Novel approaches to understanding the frontal-lobe functions.
  4. Executive functions, laterality, and sex differences.
  5. Regulation of emotions: frontal lobes and amygdala.
  6. Executive functions in development and aging.
  7. Executive dysfunction in neurodevelopmental disorders (ADHD, Tourette’s Syndrome).
  8. Executive dysfunction in dementias (Alzheimer’s disease, Lewy body dementia, Fronto-temporal dementia).
  9. Executive dysfunction in cerebrovascular disorders (CVA, aneurisms).
  10. Executive dysfunction in traumatic brain injury (reticulo-frontal disconnection syndrome).
  11. Executive dysfunction in neuropsychiatric disorders.
  12. Executive dysfunction in movement disorders (Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease).

Brain and Cognition: A Cognitive Neuroscience Lecture Series


This course is a sequence of cognitive neuroscience lectures covering a wide range of topics on the relationship between the brain and the mind. The lecture series is intended for the mental health professionals concerned with brain health and brain disorders: psychologists, neuropsychologists, psychiatrists, neurologists, cognitive neuroscientists, and other clinicians and researchers. Brain mechanisms of major cognitive functions will be reviewed, as well as the major neurocognitive disorders. While this is primarily a lecture sequence, the number of the course participants will be kept intentionally relatively small to enable active audience participation. The topics covered in this mental health seminar are listed below. They will be addressed in the course of five day-long lectures (8am-6pm with a lunch break), offered one day a month, January-May 2014.

Major Neurocognitive Disorders: A Clinical Neuropsychology Lecture Series


This course is a lecture series covering a wide range of topics on major brain disorders affecting cognition. The course is intended for the professionals concerned with brain health and brain disorders: psychologists, neuropsychologists, psychiatrists, neurologists, cognitive neuroscientists, and other clinicians and researchers. Brain mechanisms and cognitive characteristics of several major disorders affecting cognition will be reviewed. While this is primarily a lecture sequence, the number of participants will be kept intentionally relatively small to enable active audience participation. The topics covered in this mental health seminar are listed below. They will be addressed in the course of five day-long lectures (8am-6pm with a lunch break), offered one day a month, January-May 2014.

Neurocognitive Clinical Case Review: A Mental Health Workshop


This series of mental health seminars is offered in the form of an informal group discussion. The mental health seminars are intended for professionals actively involved in the diagnosis and treatment of neurocognitive disorders: psychologists, neuropsychologists, psychiatrists, neurologists, etc. Discussion group participants will have an opportunity to present their own challenging clinical cases, as well as to discuss representative cases presented by the group moderator. Clinical cases representing a wide range of neurocognitive disorders will be addressed. These will dementias, traumatic brain injury, cerebrovascular disorders, neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders, and others. The number of participants will be kept relatively small to enable active participation and discussion by every group member. The discussion group will convene once a month for a full day (8am-6pm with a lunch break) for five consecutive sessions, one day a month, January - May 2014.

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Research at LNI

Luria Neuroscience Institute supports research into a wide range of topics through an extensive network of international collaborations. These include:

  • Structural and functional differences between the two cerebral hemispheres.
  • Cortical gene expression in the frontal lobes in neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders.
  • Tourette’s syndrome and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.
  • Patterns of cognitive impairment in Parkinson’s disease (PD).
  • Lateralization of frontal-lobe functions.

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Continuing Education Credits (CE credits)

Continuing Education is being offered through PsychoEducational Resources, Inc. (PER). PER is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. PER maintains responsibility for this program and its content. PER is approved as a provider for continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards, 400 South Ridge Parkway, Suite B, Culpepper, VA 22701. www.aswb.org. Social workers should contact their regulatory board to determine course approval. The following recognize the ASWB program: AK, AL, AZ, CT,…