• Neuropsychology Course
  • Neuroscience Course
  • Neuropsychology Workshop

Cutting-Edge Neuropsychology and Neuroscience

Luria Neuroscience Institute disseminates state-of-the-art information about the brain and the mind through workshops, lectures, and seminars on various topics of neuropsychology and neuroscience. We promote and conduct cutting edge research through an international network of collaborations with leading universities and research centers. We foster and facilitate international and interdisciplinary collaborations and exchanges. Bridging the gap between clinicians, educators, and neuroscientists through a vigorous exchange of ideas and information is central to our mission. LNI is based in New York City and we offer our programs worldwide.
Please contact us for more information about LNI programs.

Video Courses “The Human Brain and Brain Disorders”

The Luria Neuroscience Institute offers four video courses about the brain and the mind. The courses are intended for the mental health professionals concerned with brain health and brain disorders: psychologists, neuropsychologists, psychiatrists, neurologists, cognitive neuroscientists, and other clinicians and researchers. Each video course takes 3 hours and 3 CE Credits will be awarded for each. The participant will be able to print out the certificate immediately after filling out a short quiz. There is a separate $15 processing fee charged by CE credit sponsor R. Cassidy Seminars.
The fee for each course is $95. A combined fee for two courses is $180, for three courses is $255, for four courses is $320.

1

Video Course: Executive Functions and the Frontal Lobes


Topics covered:
  1. Executive functions and frontal-lobe functions: are they the same?
  2. Components of executive functions (planning, impulse control, working memory, and others).
  3. Novel approaches to understanding the frontal-lobe functions.
  4. Executive functions, laterality, and sex differences.
  5. Regulation of emotions: frontal lobes and amygdala.
  6. Executive functions in development and aging.
2

Video Course: Executive Dysfunction in Brain Disorders


Topics covered:
  1. Executive dysfunction in neurodevelopmental disorders (ADHD, Tourette’s Syndrome).
  2. Executive dysfunction in dementias (Alzheimer’s disease, Lewy body dementia, Fronto-temporal dementia).
  3. Executive dysfunction in cerebrovascular disorders (CVA, aneurisms).
  4. Executive dysfunction in traumatic brain injury (reticulo-frontal disconnection syndrome).
  5. Executive dysfunction in neuropsychiatric disorders (schizophrenia, affective disorders).
  6. Executive dysfunction in movement disorders (Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease).
3

Video Course: Laterality and Functional Organization of the Brain


Topics covered:
  1. Where the traditional notions of hemispheric specialization got it wrong.
  2. Functional laterality and brain anatomy.
  3. Novel approaches to hemispheric specialization.
  4. How the two hemispheres develop and age.
  5. Laterality and gender and handedness differences.
  6. Laterality and regulation of emotions.
4

Video Course: Laterality and Brain Dysfunction


Topics covered:
  1. Laterality and learning disabilities (dyslexias vs NVLD).
  2. Laterality and dementias: Is fronto-temporal dementia lateralized?
  3. Laterality and striatal disorders (Parkinson’s disease and Tourette’s syndrome).
  4. Major cerebrovascular disorders and cerebral hemispheres.
  5. Laterality and neuropsychiatric disorders: Schizophrenia and the left hemisphere.
  6. Laterality and differential functional breakdown threshold.

Past LNI Educational Programs

Selected LNI courses are listed below in reverse chronological order.

Brain and Cognition in Health and Disease: 5-day lecture sequence (January – May, 2016)


This 5-day lecture sequence covered a wide range of topics on the relationship between the brain and the mind in health and disease. Brain mechanisms of major cognitive functions will be reviewed. Brain mechanisms and cognitive characteristics of major disorders affecting cognition will also be reviewed.

Topics covered:
  1. Basic functional neuroanatomy. Major brain structures and neurotransmitters and their contributions to neural computation.
  2. Perception and perceptual disorders. Agnosias, cerebral hemispheres, and distributed mechanisms of perception.
  3. Motor functions and motor disorders. Apraxias and hierarchic organization of motor control and action.
  4. Language and language disorders. Aphasias and distributed nature of the mechanisms of language.
  5. The deciding brain. Neural mechanisms of executive functions of the frontal lobes and dysexecutive syndromes.
  6. The bicameral brain. Structural and functional hemispheric asymmetries. Novel approaches to hemispheric specialization.
  7. The emotional brain. Limbic and cortical contributions to emotional regulation. Laterality and emotional control.
  8. Attention and attentional disorders. Voluntary attention and ADHD. Automatic attention and hemiinattention.
  9. Memory and amnesias. Neuroanatomical components of memory circuits. Types of memory and amnesias.
  10. Brain development and aging. Current concepts of neuroplasticity. Factors behind healthy cognitive aging.
  11. Major dementias. Alzheimer’s type, Lewy body, frontotemporal, cerebrovascular, and mixed. Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and its relationship to dementias.
  12. Cerebrovascular disorders. Cerebrovascular accident (CVA) and transient ischemic attack (TIA). Aneurisms and AVM’s.
  13. Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). Neuroanatomy, subtypes, natural history, cognitive profiles, and diagnosis. Forensic aspects of TBI.
  14. Neuropsychiatric disorders. Schizophrenias and affective disorders. Diagnostic and differential diagnosis issues.
  15. Neurodevelopmental disorders. Dyslexias, non-verbal learning disabilities, autism, ADHD, Tourette’s syndrome.
  16. Infectious diseases of the brain. Bacterial (Lyme), viral (HIV and Herpes Simplex), prion (Jacob-Kreuzfeld) encephalopathies.
  17. Seizures and their effect on cognition. Classification, neurobiology, and cognitive profiles. Diagnostic and differential diagnosis issues.
  18. Neoplasms and their effects on cognition. Types of brain tumors and their effects on cognition.
  19. Movement disorders. Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, ALS and their effects on cognition.
  20. Addictions and substance abuse. The effects of various illicit substances on the brain. Alcohol abuse and Korsakoff syndrome.

Neurocognitive Clinical Case Review Workshops (September – December, 2015)


Peer review and discussion of challenging and interesting clinical cases is an indispensable part of professional education and growth. Luria Neuroscience Institute provided a forum for such reviews. Participants were able to present their own clinical cases and to discuss those presented by their peers, with Elkhonon Goldberg, Ph.D., ABPP serving as the moderator. Each meeting was 3-hour long and 3 CE credits were awarded to the interested participants. The meetings were conducted in small groups in order to ensure active engagement.

Neurocognitive Clinical Case Review Workshops (April – June, 2015)


Peer review and discussion of challenging and interesting clinical cases is an indispensable part of professional education and growth. Luria Neuroscience Institute provided a forum for such reviews. Participants were able to present their own clinical cases and to discuss those presented by their peers, with Elkhonon Goldberg, Ph.D., ABPP serving as the moderator. Each meeting was 3-hour long and 3 CE credits were awarded to the interested participants. The meetings were conducted in small groups in order to ensure active engagement.

Laterality in Health and Disease (February 21, 2015)


Topics covered:
  1. Where the traditional notions of hemispheric specialization got it wrong.
  2. Functional laterality and brain anatomy.
  3. Novel approaches to hemispheric specialization.
  4. How the two hemispheres develop and age.
  5. Laterality and gender and handedness differences.
  6. Laterality and regulation of emotions.
  7. Laterality and learning disabilities (dyslexias vs NVLD).
  8. Laterality and dementias: Is fronto-temporal dementia lateralized?
  9. Laterality and striatal disorders (Parkinson’s disease and Tourette’s syndrome).
  10. Major cerebrovascular disorders and cerebral hemispheres.
  11. Laterality and neuropsychiatric disorders: Schizophrenia and the left hemisphere.
  12. Laterality and differential functional breakdown threshold.

Frontal Lobes in Health and Disease (February 7, 2015)


Topics covered:
  1. Executive functions and frontal-lobe functions: are they the same?
  2. Components of executive functions (planning, impulse control, working memory, and others).
  3. Novel approaches to understanding the frontal-lobe functions.
  4. Executive functions, laterality, and sex differences.
  5. Regulation of emotions: frontal lobes and amygdala.
  6. Executive functions in development and aging.
  7. Executive dysfunction in neurodevelopmental disorders (ADHD, Tourette’s Syndrome).
  8. Executive dysfunction in dementias (Alzheimer’s disease, Lewy body dementia, Fronto-temporal dementia).
  9. Executive dysfunction in cerebrovascular disorders (CVA, aneurisms).
  10. Executive dysfunction in traumatic brain injury (reticulo-frontal disconnection syndrome).
  11. Executive dysfunction in neuropsychiatric disorders.
  12. Executive dysfunction in movement disorders (Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease).

Brain and Cognition: A Cognitive Neuroscience Lecture Series (January – May, 2014)


This course is a sequence of cognitive neuroscience lectures covering a wide range of topics on the relationship between the brain and the mind. The lecture series is intended for the mental health professionals concerned with brain health and brain disorders: psychologists, neuropsychologists, psychiatrists, neurologists, cognitive neuroscientists, and other clinicians and researchers. Brain mechanisms of major cognitive functions will be reviewed, as well as the major neurocognitive disorders. While this is primarily a lecture sequence, the number of the course participants will be kept intentionally relatively small to enable active audience participation. The topics covered in this mental health seminar are listed below. They will be addressed in the course of five day-long lectures (8am-6pm with a lunch break), offered one day a month, January-May 2014.

Major Neurocognitive Disorders: A Clinical Neuropsychology Lecture Series (January – May, 2014)


This course is a lecture series covering a wide range of topics on major brain disorders affecting cognition. The course is intended for the professionals concerned with brain health and brain disorders: psychologists, neuropsychologists, psychiatrists, neurologists, cognitive neuroscientists, and other clinicians and researchers. Brain mechanisms and cognitive characteristics of several major disorders affecting cognition will be reviewed. While this is primarily a lecture sequence, the number of participants will be kept intentionally relatively small to enable active audience participation. The topics covered in this mental health seminar are listed below. They will be addressed in the course of five day-long lectures (8am-6pm with a lunch break), offered one day a month, January-May 2014.

Neurocognitive Clinical Case Review: A Mental Health Workshop (January – May, 2014)


This series of mental health seminars is offered in the form of an informal group discussion. The mental health seminars are intended for professionals actively involved in the diagnosis and treatment of neurocognitive disorders: psychologists, neuropsychologists, psychiatrists, neurologists, etc. Discussion group participants will have an opportunity to present their own challenging clinical cases, as well as to discuss representative cases presented by the group moderator. Clinical cases representing a wide range of neurocognitive disorders will be addressed. These will dementias, traumatic brain injury, cerebrovascular disorders, neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders, and others. The number of participants will be kept relatively small to enable active participation and discussion by every group member. The discussion group will convene once a month for a full day (8am-6pm with a lunch break) for five consecutive sessions, one day a month, January - May 2014.

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contributors

Elkhonon_Goldberg

Elkhonon Goldberg, Ph.D., ABPP

Elkhonon Goldberg, Ph.D., ABPP, is a world-renowned neuropsychologist and cognitive neuroscientist. His books The Executive Brain, The Wisdom Paradox, and The New Executive Brain have been translated into many languages and have met with international acclaim. Goldberg is an active researcher whose scientific contributions helped advance our understanding of the function and dysfunction of the frontal lobes, memory, hemispheric specialization, as well as the general principles of functional cortical organization. Goldberg has held a number of academic appointments in the USA and worldwide and is currently Clinical Professor in the Department of Neurology at NYU Medical School. Goldberg is a Diplomate in Clinical Neuropsychology and a practicing neuropsychologist with many years of wide-ranging clinical experience, as well as a sought-after educator who lectures worldwide. He has served as Visiting Professor at Hebrew University of Jerusalem, University of Sydney and other leading institutions of higher learning. Goldberg is a foreign member of Istituto Veneto, an Italian academy of science, literature and the arts; and a recipient of "Tempos Hominis" medal for international medical sciences education, and the Copernicus Prize for contributions to neuroscience and neuropsychology. Elkhonon Goldberg was a student and close associate of Alexandr Luria. He considers it an honor to continue and advance Luria’s scientific legacy and clinical tradition.
Alvaro Fernandez

Alvaro Fernandez, MBA, MA

Alvaro Fernandez, MBA, MA is the cofounder of SharpBrains, an independent market research and publishing firm helping organizations and individuals navigate the emerging brain fitness field, and the coauthor of The SharpBrains Guide to Brain Fitness: 18 Interviews with Scientists, Practical Advice, and Product Reviews, to Keep Your Brain Sharp, recently named a Best Book by AARP. He is a nationally-known speaker and expert, quoted by The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, New Scientist, CNN, and other media outlets. Alvaro also produces the largest annual global and virtual conference where scientists, technologists and professionals discuss latest developments in the field. Alvaro holds an MBA and an MA in Education from Stanford University.

Research at LNI

Luria Neuroscience Institute supports research into a wide range of topics through an extensive network of international collaborations. These include:

  • Structural and functional differences between the two cerebral hemispheres.
  • Cortical gene expression in the frontal lobes in neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders.
  • Tourette’s syndrome and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.
  • Patterns of cognitive impairment in Parkinson’s disease (PD).
  • Lateralization of frontal-lobe functions.

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Continuing Education Credits (CE credits)

Continuing Education is being offered through R. Cassidy Seminars.